Sleeping, Breathing and Addiction: Research from Experimental Biology 2019

Scientists who study physiology and other biomedical research fields—including anatomy, biochemistry, pathology and pharmacology—gather every year at the Experimental Biology (EB) meeting to network, collaborate and communicate new research findings. This year’s EB meeting in Orlando, Fla., featured studies ranging from the gut microbiome to heart disease to adolescent health. Read on to learn more … Continue reading Sleeping, Breathing and Addiction: Research from Experimental Biology 2019

Spotlight On: Homeostasis

The word homeostasis comes from the Latin roots homeo, meaning similar, and stasis, meaning condition. Homeostasis is the ability of the body to keep everything in balance. It’s important for the body to always monitor what is going on, correcting functions that are out of balance and bringing them back to normal. Homeostasis and regulation … Continue reading Spotlight On: Homeostasis

Scientific Meetings Set the Stage for Collaboration and Communication

It’s almost April, and April showers bring May flowers, as the saying goes. In the world of science, April also brings more than 170 scientific meetings, including the American Physiological Society annual meeting at Experimental Biology (EB). Scientific meetings serve an important role in the process of advancing what we know about disease and finding … Continue reading Scientific Meetings Set the Stage for Collaboration and Communication

Tart Cherries Are Sweet for Blood Vessel Health

Now that it’s officially spring, you may be looking forward to the bounty of fresh fruits and vegetables that will soon be available in grocery stores, farmers markets and perhaps even your own garden. The Montmorency cherry, tucked into the colorful landscape of the produce aisle, is tasty and healthy. The Montmorency cherry is a … Continue reading Tart Cherries Are Sweet for Blood Vessel Health

The Iceman: Wim Hof Is a Real-life Superhero

If you’re a fan of superheroes, you have probably heard of Iceman, a Marvel Comic character that has the unique ability to tolerate the cold and turn his body into ice. But you might not have heard of the real-life “Iceman,” Dutch adventurer Wim Hof who is known for his unusual ability to withstand extreme … Continue reading The Iceman: Wim Hof Is a Real-life Superhero

Gut Health: You May Lose More than Your Luggage When You Travel

Discussing digestive function, or “gut movement,” at the dinner table may be uncomfortable, but moving—or not moving—your bowels can be equally painful. Regular bowel movements, constipation and diarrhea are influenced by many daily activities, including when you eat your meals. Throw travel across several time zones into the mix and you may be in for … Continue reading Gut Health: You May Lose More than Your Luggage When You Travel

Spotlight On: Seasonal Affective Disorder

If you feel sad, gloomy and hopeless more often in the winter months compared to the rest of the year, you’re not alone. Between 4 and 6 percent of adults in the U.S. have been diagnosed with seasonal affective disorder (SAD), also known as winter depression. Another 10 to 20 percent may not have an … Continue reading Spotlight On: Seasonal Affective Disorder

Sleeping on an Airplane: It’s All about Blood Flow

This week, the I Spy Physiology blog answers a reader question: Why is it hard to sleep upright on an airplane? Having trouble sleeping when traveling on an airplane or by train or car may not be just because of the change in air pressure or the motion of the vehicle. Your circulation—or lack of … Continue reading Sleeping on an Airplane: It’s All about Blood Flow

23 and We? Mating for Life Could Be Genetic

Spending Valentine’s Day with your sweetheart might just take on a new meaning ... an evolutionary one. Even though we live in an era in which endless opportunities for a mate are just a swipe left or right, science suggests that maybe we all have that one special someone out there. Social monogamy is the … Continue reading 23 and We? Mating for Life Could Be Genetic

Why Groundhogs Really Hibernate (It’s Not Just to Predict Six More Weeks of Winter)

On February 2, the country’s most famous groundhog, Punxsutawney Phil, was once again pulled out of hibernation to ask whether we can expect six more weeks of winter. His verdict: an early spring, though according to some reports, his predictions are not very reliable. One thing that is for sure, however, is that winter is … Continue reading Why Groundhogs Really Hibernate (It’s Not Just to Predict Six More Weeks of Winter)