Scientific Meetings Set the Stage for Collaboration and Communication

It’s almost April, and April showers bring May flowers, as the saying goes. In the world of science, April also brings more than 170 scientific meetings, including the American Physiological Society annual meeting at Experimental Biology (EB). Scientific meetings serve an important role in the process of advancing what we know about disease and finding … Continue reading Scientific Meetings Set the Stage for Collaboration and Communication

Tart Cherries Are Sweet for Blood Vessel Health

Now that it’s officially spring, you may be looking forward to the bounty of fresh fruits and vegetables that will soon be available in grocery stores, farmers markets and perhaps even your own garden. The Montmorency cherry, tucked into the colorful landscape of the produce aisle, is tasty and healthy. The Montmorency cherry is a … Continue reading Tart Cherries Are Sweet for Blood Vessel Health

Maybe She’s Born with It: Genetics Give Competitive Swimmers Their Edge

Competitive swimming is a demanding sport that requires maintaining a high level of activity—while partially submerged in the water—without being able to breathe naturally. It’s a sport—like any form of exercise—that may not be suited to everyone. Years of research have shown that competitive swimmers have larger lungs and better lung function than non-swimmers. In … Continue reading Maybe She’s Born with It: Genetics Give Competitive Swimmers Their Edge

Survival of the Fishes: Research in Comparative Physiology

Animals can be cute, cuddly, weird-looking and even scary. To a comparative physiologist—someone who studies the physiological function of different species—animals can also be the key to understanding human health. Animals can provide clues about the world’s larger ecological systems. This is becoming more and more important as climate change and pollution become two of … Continue reading Survival of the Fishes: Research in Comparative Physiology

Halloween Musings on Mutations

The word “mutation” may conjure up images of fictional monsters, Marvel X-Men and creatures with non-human characteristics. It’s true that mutations are often associated with disease: something that has gone wrong in the body to produce an oddly shaped body part or sometimes cancer. However, mutations can’t be categorized as “good” or “bad” so easily. … Continue reading Halloween Musings on Mutations

Getting Younger As We Age: Could a Diabetes Drug Help?

Between the years of 1946 and 1964, families in the U.S. were having a lot of children—76 million to be exact. People who were born in this time period are generally referred to as “baby boomers.” Today, the oldest baby boomers are over the age of 70, with all baby boomers turning 65 or older … Continue reading Getting Younger As We Age: Could a Diabetes Drug Help?

How Being Male or Female Affects Our Hearts, Kidneys and Waistlines

When it comes to health, men and women aren’t always equal. Biological factors, such as our anatomy and hormones, affect the way our bodies behave when we’re healthy and when we face health challenges. Top researchers who study the influence of biological sex on health and disease gathered earlier this month in Knoxville, Tenn., for … Continue reading How Being Male or Female Affects Our Hearts, Kidneys and Waistlines

Missing Out on Sleep, Missing Out on Health: Why You Need More Sleep

Right now, one-third of the population is walking, driving or doing their job in a drunken state. Not because they’ve had too much to drink, but because they haven’t spent enough time in bed. No exaggeration—inadequate sleep has been shown to be the same as operating at a blood alcohol level of .05 percent (the … Continue reading Missing Out on Sleep, Missing Out on Health: Why You Need More Sleep

Post-traumatic Stress Disorder: 1 Part Genes, 1 Part Experience

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a debilitating, psychiatric disorder that can occur following exposure to trauma or extreme stress. While anyone who has experienced trauma can develop PTSD, it is most often associated with military veterans. Not everyone who has experienced trauma will develop PTSD—in fact, the majority of people exposed to trauma do not … Continue reading Post-traumatic Stress Disorder: 1 Part Genes, 1 Part Experience

Cardiovascular Consequences of Wildfires and Climate Change

This week, there’s been nonstop media coverage of the massive wildfires in California—including the Mendocino Complex fire, now considered the largest fire in state history. In California alone, more than 13,000 firefighters are battling flames that have scorched more than 600,000 acres. The U.S. is not the only country experiencing an uptick in catastrophic fire … Continue reading Cardiovascular Consequences of Wildfires and Climate Change