What Animals Can Teach Humans about Muscle Maintenance

Hiding Groundhog

Credit: iStock

We all know the saying “use it or lose it.” Your muscles and nerves are no exception. When people are not active, whether it’s because of bed rest, spinal cord and nerve injury, or other reasons, two big problems arise. First, the muscles shrink by losing protein (a state called atrophy). Second, nerve cells have trouble firing electrical signals to communicate with the muscles. This combination can make it harder for people who are inactive to perform normal activities in their daily lives.

Unlike in humans, inactivity in other animals is not always such a bad thing. Certain animals in the wild need to stay inactive (dormant) to survive in their environment. During times of low food availability and harsh environmental conditions, ground squirrels, frogs, bats, turtles and bears may remain inactive. In the winter, this is called hibernation, and in the summer, it’s known as estivation. Quite often, these animals’ muscles are less active than normal or completely inactive for several months at a time. Some frogs can even survive under water during the winter without using their breathing muscles. Based on the idea of  “use it or lose it,” you might think that hibernating animals wouldn’t be able to run, jump, fly or even breathe normally after months of not using their muscles. Think again!

Understanding how animals immediately return to using their muscles and nerves normally after long stretches of dormancy is a major area of research. By learning how different animals dodge neuromuscular problems related to inactivity, scientists can figure out why human muscles and nerves are not as well-equipped. For example, hibernating animals activate genes that reduce the loss of muscle protein and use less energy during periods of inactivity to avoid atrophy. These discoveries have the potential to provide new treatment options for people who are confined to bed rest or who suffer nerve injuries that leave muscles unable to contract.

Animals have already solved many problems that plague humans, such as nerve and muscle inactivity. Research that compares animal and human function is an example of comparative physiology. Comparative physiology findings can help scientists make important discoveries that would not be possible if the cures hiding inside animals were overlooked.

Joe SantinJoe Santin, PhD, is a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Missouri-Columbia.

 

Walking and the Brain, Aromatherapy for Horses and a Whole Lot More!

Physiology, the study of function from microscopic cells to complete organ systems, encompasses a wide range of fascinating topics. The annual Experimental Biology (EB) meeting is a showcase for thousands of researchers studying humans and animals alike. Check out some of the research presented at last month’s meeting in Chicago:

Close up shot of runner's shoes

Credit: iStock

Most people know that walking is good for heart health, weight management and flexibility. New research from New Mexico Highlands University reveals how your brain also benefits from walking. Each step you take sends pressure waves through your arteries and increases blood flow—and oxygen—to the brain. The researchers found that running also had a beneficial effect on blood flow, while sports like cycling that don’t involve foot impact were less likely to make a significant difference.

Dressage test

Credit: iStock

Do you like the calming scent of lavender when the pressure’s turned up? Turns out, you’re not alone. Research out of Albion College studied the effects of aromatherapy on horses. Much like people, competition horses get stressed out when they’re transported from their home to an unfamiliar venue. Stress reduction therapies are highly regulated in competition horses, and non-medicinal treatments could go a long way to calm the animals before they perform. The researcher found that stress hormone levels dropped significantly among trailered horses that were exposed to lavender aromatherapy when compared to distilled water mist.

Two women rowing on a lake

Credit: iStock

Olympic-caliber athletes appear to be the picture of strength and power. But new research suggests that high-intensity workouts without a proper recovery period could interfere with optimum bone health. A study of female Olympic rowers from Canada’s Brock University showed that the levels of a protein that stops bone mineral loss dropped during extended periods of heavy training. Bone mineral loss weakens the bones and increases the risk of stress fractures and osteoporosis.

These studies just scratched the surface of all the top-notch physiology research presented at EB. Read more highlights from this year’s meeting:

Why vitamin A and a high-fat diet don’t mix

The role of immune cells in the cause—and treatment of—preeclampsia

How an ice bag on the face can help treat severe blood loss

An “exercise pill” may be in our future

How orange essential oil reduces PTSD symptoms

 

Erica Roth

Bring on Winter! (But Stay Safe and Healthy)

 

girl playing on a winter walk

Credit: iStock

Winter officially begins next week with the winter solstice—the day of the year with the fewest hours of sunlight—on Dec. 21. With the cold weather and shorter days, you might be tempted to curl up under a blanket until the spring thaw. Whether you plan to hibernate or get outside to enjoy the chill, we’ve got some good reads about how our physiology responds to the cold weather.

Check out these throwback posts featuring cold weather tips to help you stay safe and healthy during the coldest months:

Have fun, be safe and take note of how your body adapts to the season!

Stacy Brooks and Erica Roth

 

 

Physiology for the Armchair Scientist

 

PIO Homepage Large

Visit PhysiologyInfo.org

Want to learn more about physiology without going back to school for a PhD? Check out www.physiologyinfo.org. The website, hosted by the American Physiological Society, goes in-depth to explain the multi-faceted field of physiology to nonscientists. In addition to examining hot and emerging areas of research such as brain physiology, obesity and exercise, we look at the how the body’s systems work individually and together to keep us going every day.

Our reference library houses quizzes that will test your physiology smarts, dozens of podcasts on cool research findings, a library of vintage equipment dating as far back as the 1870s and much more. We also feature timelines that highlight important milestones and people in the history of physiology.

We hope the site will serve as a helpful and informative resource about our area of research. Check back often for new information. And if you have questions you’d like us to address, let us know!

Stacy Brooks

If Only Birds Could Compete in the Summer Games

Frigatebird - Max Planck Ins

Frigatebird. Credit: Max Planck Institute.

Endurance is a hard-won characteristic of many elite athletes and is vital to winning most sporting competitions. If great frigatebirds could compete this summer, they would certainly take home a medal for endurance flight.

Frigatebirds are large sea birds with wingspans of more than six feet across. They are really good at gliding and can fly nonstop for weeks at a time. Researchers who study these birds suspected the birds got some shut-eye during these flights.

Recently,  Max Planck Institute for Ornithology researchers examined whether these birds are able to take naps while flying—yes, you read that right, while flying. To examine this, the team attached flight data recorders and measured brain activity of birds in flight.

The birds were awake and actively foraging during the day. However, at night the brain activity of the birds switched to a pattern that suggested they were taking short naps that were up to several minutes long while continuing to soar through the skies. In addition, they discovered that each hemisphere of their brain could take turns sleeping (i.e., unihemispheric sleep) or both sleep at the same time (i.e., bihemispheric sleep). Unihemispheric sleep allows the birds to stay partially alert to potential dangers,  watch where they are going and, of course, prevent themselves from falling from the sky.

This made me wonder how they prevent a crash landing when both sides of their brains take a nap. As it turns out, sleep duration for this deeper form of REM sleep only lasted a mere seconds and did not affect their flight pattern. Remarkably, these birds only average 42 minutes of sleep per day while out at sea. Researchers are still trying to figure out how they are able to function on such little sleep when they are known to sleep for more than 12 hours on land.

My thought is there must be a Starbucks in the sky.

Karen SweazeaKaren Sweazea, PhD, is an associate professor in the School of Nutrition & Health Promotion and the School of Life Sciences at Arizona State University.

Physiology as Haiku for National Poetry Month

April is National Poetry Month. To celebrate, APS members and staff wrote physiology-themed haikus—because science is art, too!

NatPoetryMonth 1

NatPoetryMonth 3                   NatPoetryMonth 9

NatPoetryMonth 2

NatPoetryMonth 10                   NatPoetryMonth 8

NatPoetryMonth 6

NatPoetryMonth 7                   NatPoetryMonth 5

NatPoetryMonth 4 - AC

 

Stacy Brooks