Of Pets, People and Lucky Ducks: Risks of COVID-19 Transmission

Credit: iStock This summer, many mourned the passing of Buddy, a 7-year old German shepherd who was the first dog diagnosed with COVID-19 in the U.S. He was diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, in May. By July, his owners reported he was having a hard time breathing and was throwing up blood. … Continue reading Of Pets, People and Lucky Ducks: Risks of COVID-19 Transmission

What Can Greenland Sharks Teach Us about (a Long) Life?

Credit: Julius Nielsen and Holly Shiels The U.S. just had its birthday, which means it’s been 244 years since the signing of the Declaration of Independence. What if I told you that in the Arctic Ocean, there are sharks swimming around today who were alive in 1776? And before you ask, yes, the very same … Continue reading What Can Greenland Sharks Teach Us about (a Long) Life?

Wild and Weird Ways Animals Keep Cool

Credit: iStock School is out, and temperatures are on the rise. It’s official: Summer has arrived. Staying cool is on everyone’s mind, but unlike people, most animals aren’t able to seek the comfort of air conditioning or even able to sweat! Here in the Bluegrass region of Kentucky, horses, like humans, usually work up a … Continue reading Wild and Weird Ways Animals Keep Cool

And Down the Stretch They Come: A Look at How Horses Power Themselves

In May, only one word is on the minds of people from Kentucky—Derby! Always held on the first Saturday in May, this year was the 145th running of the Kentucky Derby horse race. This year’s outcome was a shocker: For the first time in race history, the horse that crossed the finish line first was … Continue reading And Down the Stretch They Come: A Look at How Horses Power Themselves

23 and We? Mating for Life Could Be Genetic

Spending Valentine’s Day with your sweetheart might just take on a new meaning ... an evolutionary one. Even though we live in an era in which endless opportunities for a mate are just a swipe left or right, science suggests that maybe we all have that one special someone out there. Social monogamy is the … Continue reading 23 and We? Mating for Life Could Be Genetic

Why Groundhogs Really Hibernate (It’s Not Just to Predict Six More Weeks of Winter)

On February 2, the country’s most famous groundhog, Punxsutawney Phil, was once again pulled out of hibernation to ask whether we can expect six more weeks of winter. His verdict: an early spring, though according to some reports, his predictions are not very reliable. One thing that is for sure, however, is that winter is … Continue reading Why Groundhogs Really Hibernate (It’s Not Just to Predict Six More Weeks of Winter)

Running on Empty: No Oxygen Needed!

Take a deep breath in. Now breathe out. Each time we breathe, oxygen enters the bloodstream to keep our organs alive and working. When oxygen can’t get to our body’s tissues, they begin to fail. This is true of all organs, but most of all the brain. In conditions like stroke and cardiac arrest—when the … Continue reading Running on Empty: No Oxygen Needed!

Survival of the Fishes: Research in Comparative Physiology

Animals can be cute, cuddly, weird-looking and even scary. To a comparative physiologist—someone who studies the physiological function of different species—animals can also be the key to understanding human health. Animals can provide clues about the world’s larger ecological systems. This is becoming more and more important as climate change and pollution become two of … Continue reading Survival of the Fishes: Research in Comparative Physiology

Firefly “Magic”

Here come real stars to fill the upper skies,And here on earth come emulating flies,That though they never equal stars in size,(And they were never really stars at heart)Achieve at times a very star-like start.Only, of course, they can't sustain the part. –Robert Frost, “Fireflies in the Garden” The warm glow of fireflies—also called lightning … Continue reading Firefly “Magic”

How Do Frogs Survive the Cold? By Freezing

They aren’t moving. They’re not responding to touch or light. Their hearts aren’t beating. They’re no longer breathing. Their skin is ice-cold and hard to the touch. By that description, you probably don’t think I’m describing living things. However, there are some animals that survive like this because of a process called freeze tolerance. Unlike … Continue reading How Do Frogs Survive the Cold? By Freezing