Why Liver Cells Are Like a Rowing Crew

Credit: iStock At the back of a rowing boat sits the coxswain (pronounced “kaak-sn”) or “cox” for short. Unlike the rest of the muscle-bound rowing crew, the cox is much smaller and does not actually row. You might wonder: Why they should be kept in the boat if they don’t help with the energy-demanding tasks? … Continue reading Why Liver Cells Are Like a Rowing Crew

Floating: How Sensory Deprivation Can Improve Wellness

Credit: iStock What would you say if I told you closing yourself in a dark, enclosed space where you can float in saltwater isolation is good for you? You might wonder if I was serious. As more spas and wellness centers advertise sensory deprivation tanks, people may be skeptical about the supposed health benefits. Fear … Continue reading Floating: How Sensory Deprivation Can Improve Wellness

Blood Flow Restriction Exercise: Fad or Future?

An athlete practices blood flow restriction during exercise. Photo credit: Michigan Tech University Department of Kinesiology & Integrative Physiology During the 2020 Summer Games in Tokyo, there were reports of elite athletes training while wearing inflatable cuffs around their muscles. American swimmer Michael Andrew, who won a gold medal in the 4x100-meter medley relay, used … Continue reading Blood Flow Restriction Exercise: Fad or Future?

2021’s Most-read I Spy Physiology Posts

Credit: iStock This year, as the pandemic continued, the lights of labs and classrooms switched back on as scientists and students returned to studying, working and researching in person. Our I Spy blog contributors wrote about a wide range of topics this year, including aging, the physiological effects of grieving, achieving optimal physical performance and … Continue reading 2021’s Most-read I Spy Physiology Posts

Don’t Let Food Poisoning Spoil Your Holiday Fun

Credit: iStock In Hawai’i, no matter the holiday or occasion, there’s always a spread of pūpūs, small appetizers and finger foods that typically include spicy ahi poke, shoyu edamame and other local favorites. As my grandma says, “Everything is so ono (delicious)!” Leftovers are often packed as a convenient meal or snack for the next … Continue reading Don’t Let Food Poisoning Spoil Your Holiday Fun

The COVID ‘15’: Staying Healthy and Informed during a Pandemic

Credit: iStock When the world came to an abrupt halt in early 2020 as the COVID-19 pandemic took hold, some people who had been keeping up with a healthy lifestyle, including proper nutrition and exercise, slid out of these habits. This happened for a variety of reasons, such as lack of access to exercise equipment, … Continue reading The COVID ‘15’: Staying Healthy and Informed during a Pandemic

Get Up and Dance: It’s Good for Your Body

Credit: iStock The music starts, and you can’t help it. Your toes start tapping, and before you know it, you’re dancing. It’s a great way to exercise, meet new people if you take a class or hit a night spot, and just have fun. So, what’s going on inside your body when you get moving … Continue reading Get Up and Dance: It’s Good for Your Body

Tired after Thanksgiving Dinner? It’s Not Just the Turkey!

Credit: iStock Are you looking forward to Thanksgiving dinner? It can be a great opportunity to spend time with family or reconnect with friends while enjoying a delicious meal. But feeling bloated and exhausted after dinner could cause your excitement to be short-lived. Who knew eating could take that much out of you? The turkey, … Continue reading Tired after Thanksgiving Dinner? It’s Not Just the Turkey!

Try Fidgeting to Control Blood Sugar

Credit: iStock We usually associate autumn with several sensations that delight the senses, including crisp air, warm colors and the smell of woodsmoke. Many of us will spend time surrounded by loved ones, which may include benevolent grandmothers and aunts indulging us with food and sweets. Pecan pie, pumpkin pie and cobblers may be delicious, … Continue reading Try Fidgeting to Control Blood Sugar

Insulin: 100 Years of Saving Lives

Credit: iStock Elizabeth Hughes weighed a mere 45 pounds when she walked into the clinic of Frederick Banting, MD, on August 16, 1922. It was three days before her 15th birthday. Since her diagnosis with what today we call type 1 diabetes, Elizabeth had been strictly adhering to a starvation diet, the only available treatment … Continue reading Insulin: 100 Years of Saving Lives