Vitamin C Might Help Counteract Too Much Sitting

Credit: iStock If you are reading this, chances are you’re sitting down. Whether working at a desk, relaxing on the couch or commuting by car or public transit, the majority of us sit for the better part of our day. All of that sitting could have some not-so-great effects on our long-term health. We have … Continue reading Vitamin C Might Help Counteract Too Much Sitting

Marathon Runners: There’s a Downside to Drinking Too Much Water

Credit: iStock Imagine this: A runner has just begun the Badwater Ultramarathon, the hottest, toughest ultramarathon in the world, which winds 135 miles through Death Valley in the middle of July. After hours of intense racing, she feels incredibly thirsty and quickly gulps down a lot of water at an aid station. Worried about her … Continue reading Marathon Runners: There’s a Downside to Drinking Too Much Water

2020’s Most-read I Spy Physiology Posts

Credit: iStock In a year like no other in our lifetimes, many of us found ourselves putting aside our usual pursuits and thirsting for information on the coronavirus pandemic. I Spy Physiology blog contributors quickly switched gears to keep you informed, including a series of posts covering the physiology of COVID-19 and how it affects … Continue reading 2020’s Most-read I Spy Physiology Posts

Giving Sugar the Run-around: How Exercise Protects Blood Vessels from Sugary Drinks

Credit: iStock An estimated 70% of people living in the U.S. add too much sugar, about 23 teaspoons, to their diet each day. This is alarming because diets high in added sugar increase the risk for developing chronic conditions such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and heart disease, which is the leading cause of death … Continue reading Giving Sugar the Run-around: How Exercise Protects Blood Vessels from Sugary Drinks

Food for Thought

Credit: iStock This Thanksgiving is shaping up to be a holiday unlike most of us have seen. Smaller gatherings—or no gatherings at all—might mean that you’ll have more free time on your hands. Here’s some food for thought—check out these posts from our nutrition- and exercise-related collections. Whether you’re trying to curb your noshing, get … Continue reading Food for Thought

It’s Not Your Imagination: Women Have a Harder Time Losing Weight

Credit: iStock Obesity is a major health concern in the U.S. It is predicted that more than half of all adults living in the U.S. will be obese by the year 2030. A major problem with weight loss is that most people regain lost weight over the next year. Exercise has been shown to be … Continue reading It’s Not Your Imagination: Women Have a Harder Time Losing Weight

Exercise Is Medicine: Staying Active during the COVID-19 Pandemic

Credit: iStock The coronavirus pandemic poses a global health threat. As we try to adjust to a new way of life with teleworking, remote learning and physical distancing, we are moving less and sitting more. This is a major concern because physical inactivity and increased sitting are risk factors for cardiovascular disease, obesity and diabetes. … Continue reading Exercise Is Medicine: Staying Active during the COVID-19 Pandemic

Will You Be a Fitness Trendsetter This Year?

Credit: iStock Whether or not you made a formal New Year’s resolution—which may be waning by this time in January—it is never a bad time to begin a fitness program. Research has shown that regular exercise can improve your heart health, mental health, muscle strength, flexibility and plenty of other aspects of your health. Adding … Continue reading Will You Be a Fitness Trendsetter This Year?

2019’s Most-read Posts

Credit: iStock The year—and the decade—is drawing to a close, and we’ve had another physiology-ful year on the I Spy Physiology blog. In 2019, we’ve explored how horses power themselves and how groundhogs survive the long winter, and we have highlighted the important breakthrough of a new treatment for cystic fibrosis. We’ve also continued to … Continue reading 2019’s Most-read Posts

Try High-intensity Interval Exercise: Your Brain Might Thank You

Credit: iStock Imagine burning 30 percent more calories in half the amount of time you usually spend working out—and continuing to burn calories after the workout ends. High-intensity interval exercise (HIIE)—a type of workout that alternates bursts of intense cardiovascular exercise with brief breaks—does just that. A recent study from Brazil suggests that HIIE does … Continue reading Try High-intensity Interval Exercise: Your Brain Might Thank You