Post-vaccination Blues: Why Feeling Sick Is a Good Sign

Credit: iStock Many of us have experienced symptoms such as a sore arm or a fever after receiving vaccinations. Feeling a little under the weather can make some people hesitant to get a jab in the future. But these aftereffects are actually a good thing and an important part of how our bodies develop immunity … Continue reading Post-vaccination Blues: Why Feeling Sick Is a Good Sign

The Physiology of Grief

Credit: iStock Many of us have experienced the death of a loved one and the grief that inevitably accompanies it. Such loss is widely considered to be the most stressful event we will ever encounter in our lives. I have been thinking about this lately because in just a few months it will be five … Continue reading The Physiology of Grief

Small but Mighty: How Telomeres Could Control Vascular Aging

Credit: iStock As we get older, our cardiovascular system changes dramatically. Specifically, our blood vessels become stiffer and lose some of their ability to relax. This is known as endothelial dysfunction. Scientists debate and propose many theories about the specific causes of endothelial dysfunction with aging. Recently, telomeres have become a hot research topic. Telomeres … Continue reading Small but Mighty: How Telomeres Could Control Vascular Aging

COVID-19 Could Spell Long-term Trouble for Heart and Blood Vessels

Credit: iStock We’ve learned a lot about how SARS-CoV-2—the virus that causes COVID-19—affects our respiratory system. But as we learn more about the virus and its physiological consequences, it’s becoming clear that COVID-19’s effects may go beyond the lungs. With its demonstrated—sometimes long-lasting—effects on the heart and blood vessels, COVID-19 may be just as much … Continue reading COVID-19 Could Spell Long-term Trouble for Heart and Blood Vessels

Spotlight On: Microbiome

Credit: iStock Over the past decade, studies around how bacteria influence our health have gained attention. The human microbiome is a community of bacteria, viruses, fungi and other multicellular microorganisms. These little “bugs” exist in our gut, on our skin, on our computers and desks, and even on the foods we eat. The elements of … Continue reading Spotlight On: Microbiome

COVID-19 and the Heart

Credit: iStock SARS-CoV-2—the virus responsible for COVID-19—is a respiratory virus. When first discovered, the virus was thought to mostly affect the lungs. We now know that it affects many different organs in the body, including the heart. All respiratory viruses, including the seasonal flu, lead to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. But SARS-CoV-2 appears … Continue reading COVID-19 and the Heart

Can Your Blood Vessels Last Until 100?

Credit: iStock As life expectancy increases in the world, centenarians—people who have celebrated their 100th birthday—have become increasingly common. Scientists now have more data related to changes that accompany aging than ever before. One thing the data show is that cardiac (heart) muscle must stay strong and, most importantly, resistant to fatigue for our heart … Continue reading Can Your Blood Vessels Last Until 100?

The Healing Power of Nature

Credit: iStock Have you considered that nature is a form of medicine? The ancient Greek civilization expressed its need for nature through its father of medicine, Hippocrates, who said “airs, waters and places” were essential for well-being. You may feel profound relaxation on a beach, but you may not know exactly why you feel that … Continue reading The Healing Power of Nature

Why COVID-19 Makes It Hard to Breathe

Credit: iStock COVID-19—the viral respiratory infection caused by the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2—is a rapidly evolving disease that will undoubtedly profoundly affect many, if not all, of our lives in one way or another.  As we learn more about the disease, we can better understand how and why it affects people so differently. We don’t have a … Continue reading Why COVID-19 Makes It Hard to Breathe

Surprising Ways to Protect Your Heart: Research from Experimental Biology 2019

  Scientists who study physiology and other biomedical research fields—including anatomy, biochemistry, pathology and pharmacology—gather every year at the Experimental Biology (EB) meeting to network, collaborate and communicate new research findings. This year’s EB meeting in Orlando, Fla., featured studies ranging from the gut microbiome to heart disease to adolescent health. Read on to learn … Continue reading Surprising Ways to Protect Your Heart: Research from Experimental Biology 2019