Sleeping, Breathing and Addiction: Research from Experimental Biology 2019

Scientists who study physiology and other biomedical research fields—including anatomy, biochemistry, pathology and pharmacology—gather every year at the Experimental Biology (EB) meeting to network, collaborate and communicate new research findings. This year’s EB meeting in Orlando, Fla., featured studies ranging from the gut microbiome to heart disease to adolescent health. Read on to learn more … Continue reading Sleeping, Breathing and Addiction: Research from Experimental Biology 2019

Spotlight On: Homeostasis

The word homeostasis comes from the Latin roots homeo, meaning similar, and stasis, meaning condition. Homeostasis is the ability of the body to keep everything in balance. It’s important for the body to always monitor what is going on, correcting functions that are out of balance and bringing them back to normal. Homeostasis and regulation … Continue reading Spotlight On: Homeostasis

Running on Empty: No Oxygen Needed!

Take a deep breath in. Now breathe out. Each time we breathe, oxygen enters the bloodstream to keep our organs alive and working. When oxygen can’t get to our body’s tissues, they begin to fail. This is true of all organs, but most of all the brain. In conditions like stroke and cardiac arrest—when the … Continue reading Running on Empty: No Oxygen Needed!

Spotlight On: Circadian Rhythm

The phrase “circadian rhythm” seems to appear with increasing frequency in the news. The study of circadian rhythm also got a boost when the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to three pioneering researchers in this area. But many people may not understand what it means and why it’s important. All biological … Continue reading Spotlight On: Circadian Rhythm

Walk It Out: How Frequent Walking Breaks Help Your Brain

“Sit less, move more.” This message is being increasingly promoted in the world of health and fitness and in society at large and for good reason. The time we spend sitting is directly related to our health. In fact, too much sitting might even be harmful to people who exercise regularly. Sitting continuously for three … Continue reading Walk It Out: How Frequent Walking Breaks Help Your Brain

Taking Tests in a Heat Wave is Not So Hot

You know the feeling: It’s like a sauna outside. Sweat pours down your face and body. You drink gallons of water and still can’t get cool. You don’t want to exert much physical effort. The dog days of summer are here, but with a heightened intensity. Record-breaking heat in the U.S.—with North Texas seeing triple … Continue reading Taking Tests in a Heat Wave is Not So Hot

Relieve Stress and Anxiety with Exercise in the New Year

If getting more exercise is one of your New Year’s resolutions, here is another reason to stick with it: daily exercise—which is known to lower blood pressure—has also been shown to reduce stress and anxiety. I am not the first to notice that physical activity improves my ability to respond to stressful situations, but as … Continue reading Relieve Stress and Anxiety with Exercise in the New Year

Keeping the Juices Flowing with Beets

With the new year upon us, many people are setting new goals for themselves related to improving their health or focusing on career-related goals. If establishing better exercise and nutrition habits are part of your quest to attain optimal health and productivity in 2018, you are not alone. New gym memberships are likely to rise … Continue reading Keeping the Juices Flowing with Beets

Traumatic Brain Injury: More Than a Kick in the Head

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can be caused by many things, including car accidents, sports injuries, falls, domestic violence and explosions during combat. In the past few years, research has shown American football to be a major contributor to TBI. The media has also highlighted this, especially as iconic athletes speak about their experiences and detrimental … Continue reading Traumatic Brain Injury: More Than a Kick in the Head

A Nutty Way to Curb Cravings

Although walnuts are recommended as an effective way to control appetite in people with diabetes, just how they regulate appetite has only recently been discovered. In a new study published in the journal Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, researchers examined the brains of 10 obese volunteers who drank breakfast smoothies for five days. Some of the … Continue reading A Nutty Way to Curb Cravings