2019’s Most-read Posts

Credit: iStock The year—and the decade—is drawing to a close, and we’ve had another physiology-ful year on the I Spy Physiology blog. In 2019, we’ve explored how horses power themselves and how groundhogs survive the long winter, and we have highlighted the important breakthrough of a new treatment for cystic fibrosis. We’ve also continued to … Continue reading 2019’s Most-read Posts

Can Intermittent Fasting Help People with Diabetes?

Credit: iStock In November, we celebrate Thanksgiving—arguably the biggest food holiday of the year—and recognize National Diabetes Month in the U.S. More than 30 million people living in the U.S. have diabetes—about 29 million of them have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes makes it harder for you to use insulin (insulin … Continue reading Can Intermittent Fasting Help People with Diabetes?

Horror-ibly Wrong Physiology in Scary Movies

Filmmakers have a history of making a few common mistakes in horror movie physiology. Credit: iStock Horror movies have been thrilling fans since the late 1800s, and research has shown that people who watched a horror film had a spike in white blood cells—a basic and important part of the immune system—in response to the … Continue reading Horror-ibly Wrong Physiology in Scary Movies

A ‘Holy Grail’ for Exercise Recovery?

Credit: iStock When you start a new fitness routine—whether you are training for a marathon, planning to walk a 5K or committing to swimming more laps—choosing a plan can help you get started and keep you on track. You can find a lot of information about the best way to recover after exercising. However, whether … Continue reading A ‘Holy Grail’ for Exercise Recovery?

Ketogenic Diets: Passing Fad or Nutritional Hack?

Read recent headlines or scroll through your social media feeds and you’ll likely see people talking about “keto” diets and keto-friendly recipes. This popular diet has gained attention for a variety of reasons ranging from weight loss success stories to the unexpected body odors some people on the diet experience. If the term “keto” is … Continue reading Ketogenic Diets: Passing Fad or Nutritional Hack?

The CBD Craze: How It Affects the Vascular System

In just a few years, the therapeutic use of cannabidiol (CBD)—one of the active ingredients in marijuana (cannabis)—has attracted a lot of attention from the scientific community and general public. This elusive compound has been the subject of debate across the country. Drug classification in the U.S. is not always straightforward and often depends on … Continue reading The CBD Craze: How It Affects the Vascular System

Connections between Food, Drink and the Brain: Research from Experimental Biology 2019

Scientists who study physiology and other biomedical research fields—including anatomy, biochemistry, pathology and pharmacology—gather every year at the Experimental Biology (EB) meeting to network, collaborate and communicate new research findings. This year’s EB meeting in Orlando, Fla., featured studies ranging from the gut microbiome to heart disease to adolescent health. Read on to learn more … Continue reading Connections between Food, Drink and the Brain: Research from Experimental Biology 2019

The Iceman: Wim Hof Is a Real-life Superhero

If you’re a fan of superheroes, you have probably heard of Iceman, a Marvel Comic character that has the unique ability to tolerate the cold and turn his body into ice. But you might not have heard of the real-life “Iceman,” Dutch adventurer Wim Hof who is known for his unusual ability to withstand extreme … Continue reading The Iceman: Wim Hof Is a Real-life Superhero

23 and We? Mating for Life Could Be Genetic

Spending Valentine’s Day with your sweetheart might just take on a new meaning ... an evolutionary one. Even though we live in an era in which endless opportunities for a mate are just a swipe left or right, science suggests that maybe we all have that one special someone out there. Social monogamy is the … Continue reading 23 and We? Mating for Life Could Be Genetic

Why Being an ‘Active Couch Potato’ Is Bad for Your Health

Did you know that even if you exercise regularly, you may be what researchers call an “active couch potato?” Consider this: If you exercise 30 to 45 minutes a day—completing your daily workout all at one time—it is easy to still spend 80 to 90 percent of your waking hours sitting. A study in England … Continue reading Why Being an ‘Active Couch Potato’ Is Bad for Your Health