Circulatory Failure: When Blood Pressure Dips Too Low

We often hear about high blood pressure and how it can be dangerous to health, but low blood pressure isn’t talked about as much. For most people, a blood pressure reading lower than 90/60 mmHg may cause lightheadedness but otherwise is unlikely to cause long-term harm. However, in cases of severe disease or major injury, … Continue reading Circulatory Failure: When Blood Pressure Dips Too Low

Here Comes the Sun (and the Heat)

Summer is in full swing, and with a near-peak number of daylight hours, chances are good that there is still plenty of light left to enjoy once your workday is done. Before you get outside and bask in the sun and heat, check out these I Spy posts that explain how your body responds to … Continue reading Here Comes the Sun (and the Heat)

Childhood Stress + Immune Overactivity = High Blood Pressure in Adulthood?

About 35 million adults in the U.S. may develop high blood pressure because of negative events that happened to them during childhood. Researchers are exploring how an event you experience when you’re a kid can cause high blood pressure as an adult. About 35 million children in the U.S. experience early-life stress (ELS). ELS is … Continue reading Childhood Stress + Immune Overactivity = High Blood Pressure in Adulthood?

Out in the Sun? Think about Your Kidneys!

When your body gets overheated, it responds in several ways as it races to cool you back down and prevent serious health problems. Heat stress is when your internal body temperature rises above the normal range of 97 to 99 degrees Fahrenheit. This triggers physiological responses geared toward maintaining normal body temperature. Our internal body … Continue reading Out in the Sun? Think about Your Kidneys!

Muscle Rebuilding on the Colorado Trail

“That day, for no particular reason, I decided to go for a little run. … For no particular reason I just kept on going. I ran clear to the ocean. And when I got there, I figured, since I’d gone this far, I might as well turn around, just keep on going.” - Forrest Gump … Continue reading Muscle Rebuilding on the Colorado Trail

Desperately Seeking Kidneys: New Future for the Treatment of Chronic Kidney Disease?

The kidneys are an important pair of organs responsible for filtering water and waste out of the blood to produce urine. They help regulate blood pressure and produce hormones that the body needs to function properly. Kidney disease is often considered a silent disease because there are usually no detectable symptoms in the early stages. … Continue reading Desperately Seeking Kidneys: New Future for the Treatment of Chronic Kidney Disease?

Physiology for the Armchair Scientist

  Want to learn more about physiology without going back to school for a PhD? Check out http://www.physiologyinfo.org. The website, hosted by the American Physiological Society, goes in-depth to explain the multi-faceted field of physiology to nonscientists. In addition to examining hot and emerging areas of research such as brain physiology, obesity and exercise, we … Continue reading Physiology for the Armchair Scientist

Kidney Trouble Could be a Downstream Consequence of the Flint Water Crisis

The water crisis in Flint, Mich., highlights the toxicity of lead. While the most publicized consequence of lead exposure are the long-term effects on developing brains, this toxic metal also damages the kidneys of adults and children. The people of Flint face a number of long-term health risks related to their current lead exposure, including … Continue reading Kidney Trouble Could be a Downstream Consequence of the Flint Water Crisis

Over 50 Percent of School-Age Children in the U.S. Are Dehydrated: Why Should We Be Alarmed?

The fluid in our body is water mixed with minerals and nutrient particles. Balancing the amount of mineral and nutrients to water level ensures that our body works properly. A recent study found that more than half of U.S. children between six and 19 are not drinking enough water. What are the health consequences if … Continue reading Over 50 Percent of School-Age Children in the U.S. Are Dehydrated: Why Should We Be Alarmed?