Pumpkins: Orange, Tasty and Good for Your Health

Leaves are falling, the air is crisp and everywhere you turn, mums and hay bales decorate yards and front porches. With autumn in full swing and Thanksgiving coming up, the grocery store shelves are heavy with root vegetables and squashes, especially pumpkins. In addition to the seasonal appeal, pumpkin contains nutrients that are good for … Continue reading Pumpkins: Orange, Tasty and Good for Your Health

Four More Reasons Why You Should Exercise Regularly

You may know that being physically active can lower your risk of heart attack and stroke. Exercise also helps prevent age-related declines in muscle size and aerobic capacity. Aside from the well-known benefits of regular exercise on leading a long and healthy life (also known as the healthspan), there are other important advantages that may … Continue reading Four More Reasons Why You Should Exercise Regularly

The Fat-blocking Powers of Fiber

An estimated 610,000 people in the U.S. die from heart disease each year. One common cause of heart disease is the narrowing of blood vessels due to the buildup of fatty deposits (plaque). Many factors—including eating a lot of fatty foods—can lead to plaque buildup in blood vessels. Your liver processes excess fat by packaging … Continue reading The Fat-blocking Powers of Fiber

How, What and When to Eat: Scientists Weigh In at Experimental Biology 2018

Each year, scientists who study physiology and other biomedical research fields—including anatomy, biochemistry, pathology and pharmacology—gather at the Experimental Biology (EB) meeting. Scientific meetings such as EB provide a platform to present and learn about new and cutting-edge research and form collaborations with colleagues that can lead to advances in science and medicine. This year’s … Continue reading How, What and When to Eat: Scientists Weigh In at Experimental Biology 2018

Food, Friend or Foe: How Our Gut Recognizes Good from Bad

Think about the last time you ate an apple—from the apple’s perspective. Pulverized in your mouth and dunked in a cauldron of stomach acid, the fruit slowly passed through the intestine before its final, unceremonious exit. Digestion is a wild, wacky journey. Scientists study how the body can both absorb life-sustaining nutrients and keep out … Continue reading Food, Friend or Foe: How Our Gut Recognizes Good from Bad

Can Eating Fruit Be Hazardous to Your Health?

The U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends two cups of fresh, frozen, canned or dried whole fruits each day for most people following a 2,000-calorie diet. However, some people have difficulty breaking down fruit in their digestive tract or absorbing fructose into their bloodstream. Fructose is a type of sugar that is naturally found in fruit. … Continue reading Can Eating Fruit Be Hazardous to Your Health?

How Are Gut Bacteria and Bone Related?

Your gut contains tens of trillions of microorganisms, including at least 1,000 different species of known bacteria. Even though these bacteria are microscopic in size, they are so abundant that they make up 1 to 3 percent of your total body mass! Many of these microorganisms that live in the body are actually beneficial to … Continue reading How Are Gut Bacteria and Bone Related?

A Nutty Way to Curb Cravings

Although walnuts are recommended as an effective way to control appetite in people with diabetes, just how they regulate appetite has only recently been discovered. In a new study published in the journal Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, researchers examined the brains of 10 obese volunteers who drank breakfast smoothies for five days. Some of the … Continue reading A Nutty Way to Curb Cravings

Sugars, Fructose and Your Health

Early humans were probably jacks of all trades when it came to food—they ate what was available, and the amount of carbohydrates, proteins and fats in their diet varied dramatically depending on where they lived. Except for honey, there were likely no sweeteners to “spice” up their meals. That all changed 200 years ago when … Continue reading Sugars, Fructose and Your Health

The Brain in Your Gut

Did you know your gut has a brain of its own? It’s called the enteric nervous system. The brain in your gut is embedded in the wall of the digestive tract. Together with your “big brain,” the enteric nervous system helps control gastrointestinal function, including the mixing and grinding of food in the stomach and … Continue reading The Brain in Your Gut