Cardiovascular Consequences of Wildfires and Climate Change

This week, there’s been nonstop media coverage of the massive wildfires in California—including the Mendocino Complex fire, now considered the largest fire in state history. In California alone, more than 13,000 firefighters are battling flames that have scorched more than 600,000 acres. The U.S. is not the only country experiencing an uptick in catastrophic fire … Continue reading Cardiovascular Consequences of Wildfires and Climate Change

Virtual Reality Gives Students a New Look at Physiology

  This summer I had the opportunity to design and teach a two-week course as part of the Summer Discovery program at Penn State. The program brings high school students from all over the globe, including Taiwan, Japan and Puerto Rico, to central Pennsylvania to attend college preparation courses. Taking the lead in developing and … Continue reading Virtual Reality Gives Students a New Look at Physiology

The Fat-blocking Powers of Fiber

An estimated 610,000 people in the U.S. die from heart disease each year. One common cause of heart disease is the narrowing of blood vessels due to the buildup of fatty deposits (plaque). Many factors—including eating a lot of fatty foods—can lead to plaque buildup in blood vessels. Your liver processes excess fat by packaging … Continue reading The Fat-blocking Powers of Fiber

Spotlight On: Preeclampsia

Lady Sybil Crawley—the feisty youngest sister of a wealthy British family on the PBS television series “Downton Abbey”—made her way into viewers’ hearts. Devotees of the show were shocked when, in a surprise twist, she died soon after giving birth. Lady Sybil died from high blood pressure during pregnancy (preeclampsia) that developed into a more … Continue reading Spotlight On: Preeclampsia

The Heart Adapts to the Sex of Heart Transplant Recipients

Whether you are male or female can play a role in your health when it comes to how well you recover and thrive after an organ transplant. Because donated organs are in high demand, the sex of the donor is not taken into consideration when assessing compatibility. However, men and women who receive donated organs … Continue reading The Heart Adapts to the Sex of Heart Transplant Recipients

Herbal Tea: Healthier Hot or Cold?

Tea—the most widely consumed beverage in the world next to water—can be found in almost 80 percent of U.S. households. In 2017, people in the U.S. consumed over 84 billion servings of tea—that’s more than 3.8 billion gallons! Tea is versatile: served hot or iced, anytime, anywhere and for any occasion. Herbal tea is gaining … Continue reading Herbal Tea: Healthier Hot or Cold?

Can Altitude Affect Blood Flow and Your DNA?

An estimated 400 million people—myself included—live at elevations higher than 1,500 meters above sea level. The beautiful scenery, rugged mountains and clean air are part of the appeal to many of us. But interesting changes in the body seem to occur as a response to living at high altitude. Scientists from all over the world are … Continue reading Can Altitude Affect Blood Flow and Your DNA?

How, What and When to Eat: Scientists Weigh In at Experimental Biology 2018

Each year, scientists who study physiology and other biomedical research fields—including anatomy, biochemistry, pathology and pharmacology—gather at the Experimental Biology (EB) meeting. Scientific meetings such as EB provide a platform to present and learn about new and cutting-edge research and form collaborations with colleagues that can lead to advances in science and medicine. This year’s … Continue reading How, What and When to Eat: Scientists Weigh In at Experimental Biology 2018

Meditation, Stress and Mental Fatigue: Research from Experimental Biology 2018

Each year, scientists who study physiology and other biomedical research fields—including anatomy, biochemistry, pathology and pharmacology—gather at the Experimental Biology (EB) meeting. Scientific meetings such as EB provide a platform to present and learn about new and cutting-edge research and form collaborations with colleagues that can lead to advances in science and medicine. This year’s … Continue reading Meditation, Stress and Mental Fatigue: Research from Experimental Biology 2018

Hypertension: Silent and Unequal

High blood pressure has been coined the “silent killer” because it has no symptoms, which causes many people to go undiagnosed. A blood pressure reading that stays high for long periods of time is called hypertension. It’s one of the leading risk factors for heart disease. In addition to being silent, hypertension is also unequal—rates … Continue reading Hypertension: Silent and Unequal