Horror-ibly Wrong Physiology in Scary Movies

Filmmakers have a history of making a few common mistakes in horror movie physiology. Credit: iStock Horror movies have been thrilling fans since the late 1800s, and research has shown that people who watched a horror film had a spike in white blood cells—a basic and important part of the immune system—in response to the … Continue reading Horror-ibly Wrong Physiology in Scary Movies

Halloween Musings on Mutations

The word “mutation” may conjure up images of fictional monsters, Marvel X-Men and creatures with non-human characteristics. It’s true that mutations are often associated with disease: something that has gone wrong in the body to produce an oddly shaped body part or sometimes cancer. However, mutations can’t be categorized as “good” or “bad” so easily. … Continue reading Halloween Musings on Mutations

When Vampires Attack: How Your Body Reacts to Extreme Blood Loss

It’s Halloween and the number of vampire attacks in your neighborhood may be on the rise! What would happen to your body if you were unlucky enough to be the victim of a blood-sucking vampire? The average adult has about 1 to 1.5 gallons of blood circulating in their body. Maintaining this amount of blood … Continue reading When Vampires Attack: How Your Body Reacts to Extreme Blood Loss

The Physiology of a Good Scare

Credit: iStock With Halloween next week, you may be planning to head to a haunted house or cozy up on the couch with popcorn and a horror flick. Either way, you’re probably hoping for a good scare. Enjoying the thrill of a scary movie or riding a rollercoaster isn’t the same as a real life-threatening … Continue reading The Physiology of a Good Scare