Like Father, Like Son (and Daughter): How Your Dad’s Past Affects Your Future

Happy daughter playing with dad

Credit: iStock

What makes your father the best dad in the world? Maybe it’s his sense of humor or the times he has taken you to the movies or played catch in the yard. Or maybe it’s the fact that he made healthy lifestyle choices before you were born. Recent research suggests that your father’s health before you were conceived (preconception) may change the way your genes behave to affect your future health. It almost sounds like something out of a science fiction movie, but it’s real.

Studies tend to focus on the mother’s preconception health and the risks her baby might face later in life if she’s overweight. But a dad’s weight and early eating habits can also play a role, according to research published in the American Journal of Stem Cells. Researchers found that offspring of men who were obese before reproducing were more likely to have diabetes and be overweight. On the other hand, the researchers also found that fathers who had limited food resources in their early life caused genetic changes that protected their children—and even grandchildren—against cardiovascular disease.

Most people know that exercise is one of the healthiest lifestyle choices you can make to maintain your weight and keep your heart and even your brain healthy. However, research presented at the APS Integrative Biology of Exercise 7 meeting showed that offspring of men who exercised long term before conceiving had a higher likelihood of being obese and developing diabetes. This result was a huge surprise to the research team, but is it a reason to stop exercising? Not really. The study focused on how efficiently the body used energy on a high-fat diet. Limiting dietary fat and being active is still the way to go for most people.

Keeping stress levels low is also a good plan for dads-to-be. One study suggests that a man’s preconception stress may program his kids for mood disorders. Researchers found a pathway in the brain that transmits signals about stress hormones, and it may be passed down to the next generation.  If the signal is passed on to you, then your father’s stress levels could affect your predisposition for anxiety and depression.

These studies represent clues to learning how genetic material is transformed as it passes through generations. It’s also a reminder that following a healthy diet, staying active and maintaining mental health is important for everyone at every age.

Happy Father’s Day!

– Erica Roth

A Healthy Diet: A Prescription for a Healthy Life!

food pyramid pie chart

Credit: iStock

We have all heard the phrase “You are what you eat.” Not only is there a lot of truth in that little saying, it is also a great reminder for us to be aware of everything we put into our bodies. Everything we eat and drink has an effect on our being and our physical and mental health depends on proper nutrition.

Most people know that nutrition means getting the right amount of nutrients to fuel our bodies and brains. But the difference between the types of nutrients can be less clear.

Nutrients are divided into three categories: micronutrients, macronutrients and water.

Micronutrients are vitamins, minerals and substances such as sodium and potassium called electrolytes. They are essential for growth, development and normal cellular activities. A wide variety of fruits, vegetables and animal products such as meat and dairy are rich in micronutrients.

Macronutrients include carbohydrates (sugar and starches), protein and fats. Macronutrients are extremely important because they give us the calories we need to produce energy. Each person needs a different amount of macronutrients depending on their body size, body composition and level of physical activity. This last point—activity level—is key. We often eat and drink far too many calories for our body’s needs and store the extra calories as fat. The excess fat can become a big problem, causing inflammation, problems with metabolism and cardiovascular issues.

Water is important for maintaining your body’s fluid balance and for functions such as digestion, circulation and body temperature. We also need water to carry nutrients throughout our body and to energize our muscles.

The lack of proper nutrition is still an issue in areas of the U.S. and other Western countries. However, consuming too many calories without enough nutrients is also a critical health problem in the developed world. In fact, the definition of “malnutrition” has been updated to include overnutrition. The expanded definition of malnutrition highlights the serious threat that overnutrition and obesity have on human health.

If you want to learn more about how to fit better nutrition into your life, visit the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Choose My Plate website. This tool can help jump-start your nutrition knowledge and get you on your way to feeling great.

Audrey Vasauskas

 

When’s the Best Time to Eat? Your Body Clock Knows

 

Two teenager girls, sisters, eats fastfood on the street

Credit: iStock

The American Heart Association recently released a statement suggesting that when and how often you eat could affect your risk for developing heart disease and stroke. Until now, the focus on diet has been primarily about how much and what you eat. This news—that the time of day you eat may also be important—could change the way people are able to manage their health.

Our bodies have natural daily patterns called circadian rhythms that occur roughly over a 24-hour cycle. Many biological processes are driven by circadian rhythms, including when you go to sleep and wake up, your body temperature, heart rate, blood pressure and the release of various hormones. A “master clock,” a tiny group of cells called the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), located in the hypothalamus area of the brain manages circadian rhythms. This master clock is mostly controlled by changes in light.

Every cell in the body also has its own internal clock called a “peripheral clock.” Peripheral clocks make sure all of the cells’ functions are coordinated with the master clock. Animal studies show us the importance of keeping peripheral clocks in sync with the brain’s master clock. For example, when the peripheral clock in a mouse’s heart is disrupted, the mouse develops heart failure and dies at a much younger age than normal mice.

Unlike the master clock, peripheral clocks are more responsive to the availability of food than changes in light. As a result, eating at the “wrong” time of day could shift the rhythms of the peripheral clocks so they are out of sync with the master clock. For example, shift workers who work in the middle of the night are active when they would normally be asleep and eat at times when their body doesn’t expect food. They are at much greater risk for being overweight, becoming insulin resistant and developing cardiovascular disease because their master and peripheral clocks are likely to be out of sync.

Research in mice has shown that if they consume a high-fat meal at the end of their active period (the equivalent of a high-fat dinner for humans) they gain more weight, develop insulin resistance and have impaired cardiac function compared to mice that eat the same high-fat meal at the beginning of their active phase (breakfast).

Studies in people suggest that eating meals late in the day is linked to negative health effects, but a direct relationship has not been shown. Nevertheless, if when you eat is just as important as what you eat, it might not hurt to eat your larger meals earlier in the day if you can.

 

John Chatham

John Chatham, DPhil, is a professor of pathology and director of the Division of Molecular and Cellular Pathology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

How Obesity Fuels Inactivity

 

Women jogging in Central Park New York

Credit: iStock

More than one in three adults and one in six children in the U.S. are obese. Obesity—defined as a serious degree of overweight—is a leading cause of death, disease and disability. Although obesity has been linked to genetic disorders, it is most often caused by unhealthy behaviors and, therefore, is preventable and reversible.

Throughout the day, we get calories from food and we burn the calories off when we move our bodies. When we eat more calories than we burn, our bodies store the excess calories as fat, which accumulates over time. Eating too many calories and not moving enough are two factors that can cause obesity. Only one in five adults in the U.S. meets minimum physical activity recommendations, making physical inactivity a significant contributor to obesity. People who are overweight need to eat fewer calories and/or increase physical activity to lose excess fat. These lifestyle changes are often challenging, and may be compounded by the fact that exercise may be harder to do when you’re obese.

physical-inactivity-less-white-with-border

 The cycle of obesity. Credit: Kim Henige

Carrying excess body weight can make joint pain more likely, which makes physical activity more difficult. Now, researchers may have discovered another reason excess body weight makes physical activity more difficult. A recent study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology shows that the working muscles of obese mice tired out more quickly than those of lean mice. These findings support a cycle of obesity where inactivity leads to obesity, which leads to more inactivity. Breaking the negative cycle of obesity and re-establishing a healthy body weight is possible, but takes considerable dedication and persistence to overcome the barriers and discomfort of the process.

Remember that the path to a healthier weight starts by taking a step! Visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website for weight loss strategies, success stories of people who’ve lost weight and kept it off and more.

Kim HenigeKim Henige, EdD, CSCS, ACSM EP-C, is an associate professor and undergraduate program coordinator in the department of kinesiology at California State University, Northridge.

Handling the Pain of Acid Reflux at Holiday Time

Acid reflux

Credit: iStock

With Thanksgiving coming up, eating—of all things rich, indulgent and delicious—is top of mind for many Americans. But for people with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), eating this type of food often and in large quantities can be a challenge. This week is GERD Awareness Week, a good time to learn how to prevent GERD symptoms and still enjoy your holiday season.

GERD is the return of stomach contents, including acid, into the esophagus, sometimes known as acid reflux. More than 60 million people in the U.S. experience GERD symptoms, such as frequent heartburn, at least once a month.

You may have a higher risk of having GERD if you:

  • produce a lot of gastric acid
  • have a hiatal hernia
  • have a weak lower esophageal sphincter (the ring of muscle between the esophagus and stomach)
  • are obese
  • smoke
  • drink alcohol or a lot of caffeine

Women have additional risk factors, including being a young adult and adopting a stooping or slouching posture. Certain foods, including peppermint, chocolate, fatty or fried foods, and acidic fruits, also raise the risk of developing heartburn and acid reflux.

Simple dietary and lifestyle changes can be effective for many people to reduce the frequency and intensity of GERD symptoms, including:

  • losing weight if needed
  • quitting smoking
  • eating small meals throughout the day
  • avoiding foods that cause symptoms
  • waiting at least two hours before lying down after a meal

Another first line of treatment is medication, such as antacids or proton pump inhibitors. These drugs are available over the counter and by prescription from your doctor and reduce or stop the production of stomach acid to prevent symptoms.

If occasional heartburn bothers you after a big meal, try making lifestyle changes to help you feel better. If your symptoms persist, your doctor may look deeper into the possible causes for your discomfort. Knowing the risk factors for GERD can help you avoid complications and stay healthy throughout the holidays and all year long.

To learn more about GERD, visit the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases website

 

layla-al-nakkashLayla Al-Nakkash, PhD, is a professor in the Department of Physiology, at Midwestern University, Glendale, Ariz. She is the course director for medical physiology for medical and podiatry students. Her area of research relates to understanding how intestinal dysfunction (in diseases such as cystic fibrosis and diabetes) can be ameliorated by changes in diet.

How Your Immune System Can Make You Sick

tissue paper

Credit: Getty Images

Your immune system has a Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde complex when it comes keeping you healthy.  Traditionally, the immune system is seen as a good guy that kills off viruses and eats up bacteria attacking your body. However, it can also turn against you and cause disease.

To fight infection, the cells of your immune system produce proteins called cytokines that cause the infected area to swell, turn red, heat up and hurt. This reaction is called inflammation, and it helps you recover from viral and bacterial invaders relatively quickly.

Cytokines can also reduce inflammation, allowing for a system of checks and balances that prevents inflammation from lasting too long and hurting you instead of helping you. For example, the immune cell called “natural killer T cell” produces cytokines that cause inflammation and is kept in check by the immune cell “regulatory T cell”, which produces cytokines that counteract inflammation. Some immune cells can even produce both types of cytokines and switch roles. The immune cell “macrophage” can go from causing inflammation to kill the infection to preventing inflammation to help the injury heal.

Inflammation becomes bad when it lasts too long or is turned on at the wrong time. The cytokines can cause changes to your body that lead to disease, including stroke, heart disease, obesity and diabetes. Scientists are still unsure why the immune system can ignore its own safeguard. For obesity and diabetes, scientists at Harvard Medical School think the culprit is a hormone called leptin.

The researchers noticed that in obese people and obese mice immune cells found in fat called “mast cells” had five times more leptin than their lean counterparts. Moreover, mice that did not have leptin in their mast cells did not become obese or diabetic when put on a high-fat diet. Interestingly, obese mice lost weight and improved blood sugar levels when they were injected with mast cells with no leptin. This happened because mast cells with no leptin produced inflammation-reducing cytokines, while mast cells with leptin produced inflammation-causing cytokines, the research team said. In obesity and diabetes, leptin turned the immune system into a bad guy.

This is the first study to show that simply reducing the amount of leptin in mast cells can prevent, and even reverse, obesity and diabetes caused by a high-fat diet. Understanding the details of how our immune system causes disease can lead to new and better treatments to help people stay healthy.

Dao Ho, PhD

 

Dao H. Ho, PhD, is a biomedical research physiologist at Tripler Army Medical Center.