Why Marriage Is Good for Your Heart

Loving tourists in Cartagena

Credit: iStock

Valentine’s Day is a time when many of us reflect on the importance of our closest relationships. Whether they include family, friends or a significant other, science is not silent on the impact these relationships have on our health. A review of 148 studies reveals that strong social relationships are associated with a 50 percent increased likelihood of survival, regardless of medical condition. Other studies link low social support to an increased risk and incidence of heart disease. The newest research, however, explores the effect our most intimate relationships—with a romantic partner—have on heart health.

A study that looked at more than 6,000 people reports that being single is associated with heart disease. Specifically, people who were single had a 45 percent higher rate of death from heart disease than those who were married. A striking finding in this study was that even though the reason for being unmarried varied among the participants—some people had never married, others were divorced, separated or widowed—the risks were consistently lower in married people. From these results, the overall benefit of the spousal relationship on heart health seems clear.

Many factors may account for the positive effect of marriage on heart health, including:

  • improved social support,
  • a less sedentary lifestyle, and
  • increased motivation to make healthy lifestyle changes.

The quality of marital relationships over time also influences heart disease risk factors. Men who described their relationships as “improving” had a lowering of risk factors compared to those in marriages categorized as “consistently good” or “deteriorating.”

In other words, marriage is generally good for your heart health and even better when you work to improve that relationship over time. So as you think about those closest to your heart on Valentine’s Day, do your heart a favor and take your sweetheart on a date.

Shawn Bender, PhD

Shawn Bender, PhD, is an assistant professor at the University of Missouri and a research health scientist at the Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans’ Hospital.

Go Ahead, Wear Your Heart on Your Sleeve!

Jousting Competition

A jousting knight wears his heart on his sleeve. Credit: iStock

In medieval times, a jousting knight would wear the colors of the lady he was courting tied around his arm. Hence, the phrase “Wear your heart on your sleeve” was born. Today, we use this romantic phrase to describe someone who expresses their emotions openly. How applicable that ancient phrase really is to maintaining a healthy heart!

In a landmark paper, a group of scientists discussed how stress and social interactions with others affected the health of the heart. It is well-known that stress is a major factor in the development of heart disease. This is because stress is a double whammy: It activates the “fight-or-flight” nervous response, and it causes inflammation in the cells that line blood vessels. Both of these events can damage blood vessels in the heart.

Research shows that positive social interaction expressing emotion is important for heart health. Support from a spouse or partner, friends or other groups can reduce stress and help you stick to a healthy diet and exercise program to minimize your risks.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide, with annual deaths creeping up to 24 million. Reducing stress and anxiety is an important aspect of keeping your heart healthy. Exercise, yoga, meditation and even deep breathing can promote a sense of calm when tensions mount. Try running or yoga with a friend or join an exercise class to keep you on track for a healthy heart. Go ahead, wear your heart on your sleeve—it’s good for you!

February is American Heart Month. You can find more information about keeping your ticker ticking on the American Heart Association’s website.

Audrey Vasauskas