Not Horsing Around: Therapeutic Effects of Horseback Riding

Choosing your favorite part of a trip can be a difficult decision for travelers. I had countless unforgettable and unique experiences during a recent four-week trip to Chile. One excursion that stands above the rest was a weekend trip to San Pedro de Atacama in Northern Chile. I was studying with a group of students … Continue reading Not Horsing Around: Therapeutic Effects of Horseback Riding

Myasthenia Gravis May Be (Literally) All Greek to You

Myasthenia gravis is a disease that affects the way that muscles receive signals from nerves. Myasthenia is Greek for “muscle weakness,” which is a good description of this disease’s symptoms. Muscle weakness, which worsens after physical activity but gets better with rest, is the primary symptom of the condition. Weakness may occur in any skeletal … Continue reading Myasthenia Gravis May Be (Literally) All Greek to You

Is Running Barefoot Better than Wearing Shoes?

Visit any sporting goods store today, and you’ll see a wall display full of running shoes for all types of runner, from sprinters to marathoners and everything in between. Before the 1970s, however, specialized running shoes weren’t readily available, and most runners ran with minimally supportive shoes or without any shoes at all. It is … Continue reading Is Running Barefoot Better than Wearing Shoes?

Walking and the Brain, Aromatherapy for Horses and a Whole Lot More!

Physiology, the study of function from microscopic cells to complete organ systems, encompasses a wide range of fascinating topics. The annual Experimental Biology (EB) meeting is a showcase for thousands of researchers studying humans and animals alike. Check out some of the research presented at last month’s meeting in Chicago: Most people know that walking … Continue reading Walking and the Brain, Aromatherapy for Horses and a Whole Lot More!

Meet Christina McManus, Associate Professor of Physiology

  March is Women’s History Month, a time when women who have challenged—and continue to challenge—traditional roles are celebrated. In the final installment of our series, we introduce you to APS member Christina McManus, PhD, an associate professor of physiology at the Alabama College of Osteopathic Medicine. (Read part one, part two, part three and … Continue reading Meet Christina McManus, Associate Professor of Physiology

Meet Karyn Hamilton, Health and Exercise Science Professor

March is Women’s History Month, a time when women who have challenged—and continue to challenge—traditional roles are celebrated. In part four of our series, we introduce you to Karyn Hamilton, PhD, a professor in the Department of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University. (Read part one, part two and part three). What is your … Continue reading Meet Karyn Hamilton, Health and Exercise Science Professor

Meet Sue Bodine, Physiology Professor

March is Women’s History Month, a time when women who have challenged—and continue to challenge—traditional roles are celebrated. In part three of our series, we introduce you to APS member and incoming editor-in-chief of the Journal of Applied Physiology, Sue C. Bodine, PhD. (Read part one and part two). What is your title/role (including institution name)? … Continue reading Meet Sue Bodine, Physiology Professor

How Obesity Fuels Inactivity

  More than one in three adults and one in six children in the U.S. are obese. Obesity—defined as a serious degree of overweight—is a leading cause of death, disease and disability. Although obesity has been linked to genetic disorders, it is most often caused by unhealthy behaviors and, therefore, is preventable and reversible. Throughout … Continue reading How Obesity Fuels Inactivity

Are Cross-Country Skiers Premier Athletes?

  With winter upon us, it is a good reminder that cold weather is not an excuse for inactivity. Athletes from cold-weather climates, such as the Nordic countries, are not content to stay indoors during winter. In fact, cross-country skiers from these colder climates might be considered the premier human aerobic athletes. Although some picture … Continue reading Are Cross-Country Skiers Premier Athletes?

2016’s Ten Most Read Posts

It’s been a physiology-full 2016 on the I Spy Physiology blog! From exercise to respiration to heart health and beyond, we’ve explored how the bodies of humans and other animals work, adapt and react. Today, we take a look back at our 10 most read posts of the year. Concussions among football players was headline … Continue reading 2016’s Ten Most Read Posts