The Fat-blocking Powers of Fiber

An estimated 610,000 people in the U.S. die from heart disease each year. One common cause of heart disease is the narrowing of blood vessels due to the buildup of fatty deposits (plaque). Many factors—including eating a lot of fatty foods—can lead to plaque buildup in blood vessels. Your liver processes excess fat by packaging … Continue reading The Fat-blocking Powers of Fiber

Herbal Tea: Healthier Hot or Cold?

Tea—the most widely consumed beverage in the world next to water—can be found in almost 80 percent of U.S. households. In 2017, people in the U.S. consumed over 84 billion servings of tea—that’s more than 3.8 billion gallons! Tea is versatile: served hot or iced, anytime, anywhere and for any occasion. Herbal tea is gaining … Continue reading Herbal Tea: Healthier Hot or Cold?

Do Caffeine and Menstrual Cycles Affect Athletic Performance?

Menstruation and its effect on athletic performance is not often discussed in athletics, even though most female athletes deal with it in their daily lives. However, more researchers have begun to look at this subject, and some are observing how other factors, such as caffeine consumption, could influence a female’s performance during sports. A recent … Continue reading Do Caffeine and Menstrual Cycles Affect Athletic Performance?

How, What and When to Eat: Scientists Weigh In at Experimental Biology 2018

Each year, scientists who study physiology and other biomedical research fields—including anatomy, biochemistry, pathology and pharmacology—gather at the Experimental Biology (EB) meeting. Scientific meetings such as EB provide a platform to present and learn about new and cutting-edge research and form collaborations with colleagues that can lead to advances in science and medicine. This year’s … Continue reading How, What and When to Eat: Scientists Weigh In at Experimental Biology 2018

Curcumin, the Golden Spice

Growing up, I enjoyed spending time in my grandmother’s kitchen. Her cooking usually involved an array of colorful spices, including a generous mix of curry powder in nearly every Indian recipe. You can’t mistake the tantalizing smell—cooking with this yellow-tinted powder can fill a room quite quickly. But it appears that there is much more … Continue reading Curcumin, the Golden Spice

Can Eating Fruit Be Hazardous to Your Health?

The U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends two cups of fresh, frozen, canned or dried whole fruits each day for most people following a 2,000-calorie diet. However, some people have difficulty breaking down fruit in their digestive tract or absorbing fructose into their bloodstream. Fructose is a type of sugar that is naturally found in fruit. … Continue reading Can Eating Fruit Be Hazardous to Your Health?

Keeping the Juices Flowing with Beets

With the new year upon us, many people are setting new goals for themselves related to improving their health or focusing on career-related goals. If establishing better exercise and nutrition habits are part of your quest to attain optimal health and productivity in 2018, you are not alone. New gym memberships are likely to rise … Continue reading Keeping the Juices Flowing with Beets

A Nutty Way to Curb Cravings

Although walnuts are recommended as an effective way to control appetite in people with diabetes, just how they regulate appetite has only recently been discovered. In a new study published in the journal Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, researchers examined the brains of 10 obese volunteers who drank breakfast smoothies for five days. Some of the … Continue reading A Nutty Way to Curb Cravings

Sugars, Fructose and Your Health

Early humans were probably jacks of all trades when it came to food—they ate what was available, and the amount of carbohydrates, proteins and fats in their diet varied dramatically depending on where they lived. Except for honey, there were likely no sweeteners to “spice” up their meals. That all changed 200 years ago when … Continue reading Sugars, Fructose and Your Health

Beer Does a Body Good?

Bone is a living organ that constantly breaks down and rebuilds itself. As we get older, bone breaks down more and rebuilds less, which often leads to weaker bones over time. If we lose too much bone, we increase our risk of fracture and developing osteoporosis. Women tend to have weaker bones and a faster … Continue reading Beer Does a Body Good?