Dear Mom: Happy Mother’s Day … and Thanks for Sharing Your Bones

Warning! Understatement of the year to follow: Many fascinating changes take place in a mother’s body during and after pregnancy. One of the most interesting changes for many new moms, myself included, is breastfeeding. Often called “nature’s perfect baby food,” breast milk seems to contain an almost magical mix of essential elements—proteins, fats, carbohydrates, water, … Continue reading Dear Mom: Happy Mother’s Day … and Thanks for Sharing Your Bones

Chemicals in Plastic May Be Bad News for Mothers and Babies

If you’re a health-conscious shopper, you’ve probably noticed a new generation of “healthier” plastics popping up in grocery stores. These new plastics are “BPA-free,” which means a chemical called bisphenol-A (BPA) has been replaced with alternative chemicals. But are chemicals in plastic really something to be concerned about? Researchers from the University of Georgia and … Continue reading Chemicals in Plastic May Be Bad News for Mothers and Babies

Life After A Life-Saving Treatment: Lung Health in Young Adults Who Were Born Prematurely

In 1963, President John Kennedy’s wife, Jackie, gave birth to a little boy three weeks early. The baby survived only 39 hours before dying of hyaline membrane disease, more commonly known as respiratory distress syndrome. The first successful treatments began in 1991, and now nearly 99 percent of babies like the Kennedy baby survive prematurity. … Continue reading Life After A Life-Saving Treatment: Lung Health in Young Adults Who Were Born Prematurely

A New Discovery to Help Prevent Preterm Labor

In pregnancy, it’s best for women to carry babies to full term, considered to be between 39 and 40 weeks of pregnancy. Babies born before that time run the risk of having a small birth weight. Small birth weight is associated with incomplete development and increases the risk of cardiovascular disease in children, as well … Continue reading A New Discovery to Help Prevent Preterm Labor

The Pregnancy Condition that Can Predict Future Heart Disease Risk

With rising rates of obesity and diabetes in the United States, high blood pressure in pregnant women is becoming increasingly prevalent. This can result in many pregnancy complications, the most severe of which include preeclampsia. Preeclampsia is a serious pregnancy-related condition that can affect the placenta, kidneys, liver and other organs. It can be life-threatening … Continue reading The Pregnancy Condition that Can Predict Future Heart Disease Risk