Beer Does a Body Good?

Bone is a living organ that constantly breaks down and rebuilds itself. As we get older, bone breaks down more and rebuilds less, which often leads to weaker bones over time. If we lose too much bone, we increase our risk of fracture and developing osteoporosis. Women tend to have weaker bones and a faster … Continue reading Beer Does a Body Good?

Dysphagia Can Be a Tough Pill to Swallow

Your body performs many physiological functions without you really paying attention to them. One example is swallowing. Chances are you’ve never really thought about what your body needs to do in order to swallow. Though it’s literally the lifeline that allows you to get the nutrients and calories you need to survive, swallowing is a … Continue reading Dysphagia Can Be a Tough Pill to Swallow

Meet Christina McManus, Associate Professor of Physiology

  March is Women’s History Month, a time when women who have challenged—and continue to challenge—traditional roles are celebrated. In the final installment of our series, we introduce you to APS member Christina McManus, PhD, an associate professor of physiology at the Alabama College of Osteopathic Medicine. (Read part one, part two, part three and … Continue reading Meet Christina McManus, Associate Professor of Physiology

2016’s Ten Most Read Posts

It’s been a physiology-full 2016 on the I Spy Physiology blog! From exercise to respiration to heart health and beyond, we’ve explored how the bodies of humans and other animals work, adapt and react. Today, we take a look back at our 10 most read posts of the year. Concussions among football players was headline … Continue reading 2016’s Ten Most Read Posts

Nanoparticles: A High-Tech Solution for Lung Cancer Treatment

Credit: iStock Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death for both men and women in the U.S., according to the American Cancer Society (ACS). Responsible for 1 in 4 cancer deaths, there were approximately 224,390 new cases and 158,000 lung cancer deaths in 2016 alone. Despite the seemingly grim outlook for lung cancer … Continue reading Nanoparticles: A High-Tech Solution for Lung Cancer Treatment

The Proof Is in the Papers: APS’s Long History with the Nobel Prize

Last month, Yoshinori Ohsumi of the Tokyo Institute of Technology was awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Dr. Ohsumi won for his research in autophagy, the mechanism that cells use to break themselves down—an essential function in all cells. The Nobel Prize, arguably the most prestigious award in the life sciences, was … Continue reading The Proof Is in the Papers: APS’s Long History with the Nobel Prize

The Physiology of a Good Scare

Credit: iStock With Halloween next week, you may be planning to head to a haunted house or cozy up on the couch with popcorn and a horror flick. Either way, you’re probably hoping for a good scare. Enjoying the thrill of a scary movie or riding a rollercoaster isn’t the same as a real life-threatening … Continue reading The Physiology of a Good Scare

Keeping Up with the Highland Natives

Machu Picchu. Credit: Anne Crecelius After spending three weeks getting to know the geography of Chile and making important connections with other academics, I treated myself to some tourist activity in Peru, Chile’s neighbor to the north. I met my mother in Lima, and we began a nine-day tour to visit the famous Incan sites … Continue reading Keeping Up with the Highland Natives

Depression + Pregnancy = Diabetes?

Morning sickness, swollen ankles and a growing belly are just a few of the many physiological changes that women experience during pregnancy. The changes  we can see are just the tip of the iceberg. Blood volume, bones, heart rate, skin and many other parts of a woman’s body function differently during pregnancy. Pregnancy-related changes can … Continue reading Depression + Pregnancy = Diabetes?

What Blood Vessels Tell Us about Childhood Obesity

Did you know that blood vessels can “talk?” That’s right: Changes in the cells within blood vessels can communicate important information about the overall health of the cardiovascular system. The inside of blood vessels are lined endothelial cells—protective cells that form a tight barrier through which only certain substances such as water or glucose can … Continue reading What Blood Vessels Tell Us about Childhood Obesity