The Anti-Aging Cure May Be in Your Medicine Cabinet

Rapamycin, a drug used to prevent organ transplant rejection, may also turn back time—in dogs at least. A study is underway to see if rapamycin can delay aging in dogs, and the puppy-like energy of one canine participant, eight-year-old Bela, gives some hope that the drug might work. Rapamycin is one of several drugs prescribed … Continue reading The Anti-Aging Cure May Be in Your Medicine Cabinet

Of Ice Swims and Mountain Marathons (and So Much More)

If you regularly read this blog, you may know that the research questions that physiologists ask relate to wide range of topics—cells, tissues and organs, insects and animals, and how the environment influences all of these things. Nowhere is this more apparent than at the annual Experimental Biology meeting. This year, thousands of physiology-based research … Continue reading Of Ice Swims and Mountain Marathons (and So Much More)

Running a Thousand Miles Can Be Exhausting. How Do Iditarod Sled Dogs Do It?

Have you ever had a morning where you just did not have the energy to go out for your five-mile run? What if you woke up in New York City and had to run to Miami? That is the distance Alaskan Huskies run every year at the annual Iditarod sled dog race. How these amazing … Continue reading Running a Thousand Miles Can Be Exhausting. How Do Iditarod Sled Dogs Do It?

Football Safety Tips from Birds? How Woodpeckers Avoid Concussions after Head Impact

The NFL has been under a lot of heat over concussion injuries in its players and the long-term brain injury and health impacts. With the size of the player and the speed he runs, it’s not hard to imagine the sheer force and damage that can occur from even a single collision. Woodpeckers, though, bang … Continue reading Football Safety Tips from Birds? How Woodpeckers Avoid Concussions after Head Impact

Too Cold Outside? Try Out Polar Mammals’ Methods of Staying Warm

If temperatures in the teens (or the 50s for the warmer climates) make you grumble, be glad you’re not a mammal living in the Arctic or around Antarctica. These animals face much colder air temperatures of -40 to -76 degrees Fahrenheit. While humans bundle up with thick sweaters and jackets to get through the winter … Continue reading Too Cold Outside? Try Out Polar Mammals’ Methods of Staying Warm

A New Meaning for ‘Food Baby’: How the Burmese Python Digests Big Meals

Thanksgiving dinner can leave the stomach feeling and looking stuffed beyond capacity. The Burmese python goes beyond the post-meal bulge: Its intestines and other organs grow too, and these changes happen within days of eating. A recent study in Physiological Genomics examined how the organs can grow so much so soon. The Burmese python takes … Continue reading A New Meaning for ‘Food Baby’: How the Burmese Python Digests Big Meals

Look to the Sky for Lessons in High Blood Sugar

So much of what we hear in health news today involves how what we eat or how much we move affects the way we live. For example, if we overeat sugar or unhealthy foods and don’t get enough exercise, we can find ourselves at increased risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. These can affect our … Continue reading Look to the Sky for Lessons in High Blood Sugar

A Bug Steps into a Hole…

What happens when you accidentally step into a hole? You were expecting a solid landing, but all of a sudden, it’s not there. One leg is left hanging, and you are caught off-guard. How the body reacts in this situation says a lot about how the brain controls the muscles used to walk. A new … Continue reading A Bug Steps into a Hole…