The Trouble with E-Cigs: Why They May Pose More Harm than Good

E-Cigs

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The market for electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) and vaping has surged in popularity within the past five years, while traditional cigarette sales have declined. From 2012 to 2013, e-cig sales more than doubled to $1.7 billion. By 2015, sales were estimated at $3.7 billion.

Although manufacturers claim that e-cigs are safer than traditional cigarettes, their use has been associated with clear health risks. E-cigs may seem like they are producing harmless water vapor, but that vapor has been shown to contain a mix of cancer-causing chemicals. Some of the toxin levels are comparable to those in cigarettes.

E-cigs are associated with cellular damage and decreased cough reflex sensitivity after just one use. Cough reflex—triggered by chemical or mechanical irritants—protects the upper respiratory system from infection by getting rid of respiratory secretions (mucus) and foreign material from the lungs. Decreased cough reflex sensitivity may increase the risk of infection because mucus and foreign material aren’t always cleared immediately from the airways. Studies on animals have found that nicotine-containing e-cig fluid may cause changes in the lungs similar to what humans experience with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD is a condition often seen in long-term smokers. These changes include narrowing of the airways, more mucus production and increased inflammation. E-cig vapor has also been linked to substantial DNA damage and increased cancer risk and decreased lung function.

no smoking no vaping sign ban cigarette and electronic cigarette not allowed blue e-cigarette and cigarette in red circle realistic vector illustration

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More and more research is providing evidence that e-cigs pose serious health risks. One of the greatest concerns is the potential serious long-term consequences in teenagers. Teens are easy targets for tobacco and e-cig advertisers and may also be easily swayed into becoming lifelong tobacco users. Because of the potential health risks of e-cigs, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends raising the legal purchasing age for both traditional cigarettes and e-cigs from 18 to 21. Marketing strategies of e-cigs try to make e-cigs look socially acceptable to young adults and teens by promoting candy-inspired flavors and vapor tricks on social media. The tendency for the e-cig market to prey on young adult consumers is particularly troubling because the brain is developing critical circuitry that relates to lifelong habits during this time. Users younger than 21 tend to remain nicotine users for life.

The Great American Smokeout sponsored by the American Cancer Society, is November 16. This event is designed to help smokers make a plan to quit, whether it’s traditional tobacco products or e-cigs. Their health depends on it.

 

Leigh Graziano croppedLeigh Graziano, MS, is a second-year medical student at the Alabama College of Osteopathic Medicine. She works with Audrey Vasauskas, PhD, on research on pulmonary arterial hypertension, which is high blood pressure in your lungs. In her free time, Leigh enjoys yoga, mountain biking and fishing.

Muscle Rebuilding on the Colorado Trail

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“That day, for no particular reason, I decided to go for a little run. … For no particular reason I just kept on going. I ran clear to the ocean. And when I got there, I figured, since I’d gone this far, I might as well turn around, just keep on going.” – Forrest Gump

The feats of ultra-endurance athletes are remarkable and sometimes incomprehensible. There are few published data on how the body deals with the stresses of an ultra-endurance event because the fieldwork is difficult to perform without interfering with the athlete’s performance. A new study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology explores how muscle deals with prolonged exercise performed in an “unfriendly” environment (high mileage at high altitude). The primary question these researchers wanted to know: In an event that requires a lot of energy, would the muscles have enough energy to rebuild and adapt to the stress?

The researchers studied a single cyclist during a mountain bike race that spanned 497 miles from Denver to Durango, Colorado, along the high-altitude Colorado Trail. The participant rode 19 to 20 hours each day for five days. The investigators took muscle and blood samples at the beginning and end of the race and compared the changes to a period of normal exercise training.

They found that during the race, the muscles were able to make mitochondria—which are responsible for producing energy in the cells—at an extremely high rate. In addition, the mitochondria increased their ability to use fat energy sources, an important adaptation for long-term exercise. The proteins that contract the muscle also continued to build, but not at a rate fast enough to maintain the muscle’s size, which led to the muscle shrinking in size. In addition, there was significant muscle damage and inflammation. The blood samples also showed evidence of significant stress with changes that were consistent with impaired kidney and liver function.

Overall, this study suggests that when the body is performing an exceptionally, energetically challenging activity, muscle is able to rebuild at an extremely high rate, although maybe not enough, to try to adapt to its new demands. In this case, the extreme stress of the race caused significant muscle damage and organ dysfunction. Scientists hope to continue to find new approaches to study the demands of ultra-endurance athletes to better understand the limits of human performance.

 

Ben MillerBenjamin Miller, PhD, is an associate professor in the department of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University. He co-directs the Translational Research in Aging and Chronic Disease (TRACD) Laboratory with Karyn Hamilton, PhD.

Yoga + Deep Breathing = A Calmer You

Relaxing Together in a Yoga Class

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“I’m not flexible enough to do yoga!” In my 12 years as a yoga instructor, this is the excuse I have heard most often for why people aren’t practicing yoga. My initial response is usually, “That’s exactly why you should be practicing yoga!” However, I am also an assistant professor of physiology, and I know that the benefits of yoga go far beyond flexibility. Participating in yoga regularly imparts a number of benefits— from weight management to stress reduction—to our physical and mental health.

One very important side benefit of yoga that is linked to both physical and mental health is breath control. Slow, deep, conscious abdominal (belly) breathing, especially during difficult poses, trains us to use the same type of breathing in challenging scenarios off the mat, such as giving a presentation, taking an exam or performing a difficult task.

Why do deep, yogic belly breaths help us through stressful situations? Recent studies suggest that this type of breathing can decrease firing of the sympathetic nervous system while increasing activity of the parasympathetic nervous system. The spike in heart rate and blood pressure, sweaty palms and voice tremors you might experience when you speak in front of an audience, for example, are due to activation of your sympathetic nervous system—the “fight-or-flight” response. This nervous response is great if you are running from a bear in the woods. But in real life these changes can lead to short-term memory problems and high anxiety levels that may interfere with giving a presentation or taking a test.

If you approach stressful situations with abdominal breaths, however, you help shut down the fight-or-flight reaction and increase the parasympathetic nervous response. Called a relaxation response, your heart rate slows down and your blood pressure returns to normal. Once you’re relaxed, you can approach the task at hand in a calm, collected way.

Many types of yoga incorporate physical movements with deep abdominal breathing. The physical demands of these movements have the potential to cause the fight-or-flight response, but by combining these poses with yogic breathing, we learn how to control our breath in seemingly stressful situations. So the next time someone tells me they are not flexible enough to do yoga I will ask them if they can take a deep breath. If they say yes, then I know they are ready to go!

September is National Yoga Month. Check out a yoga class or festival near you.

Audrey Vasauskas

A Nutty Way to Curb Cravings

Walnuts_by_RustedStrings

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Although walnuts are recommended as an effective way to control appetite in people with diabetes, just how they regulate appetite has only recently been discovered. In a new study published in the journal Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, researchers examined the brains of 10 obese volunteers who drank breakfast smoothies for five days. Some of the volunteers drank smoothies containing walnuts, while others drank nut-free smoothies that looked and tasted identical. One month later, the participants repeated the study, but this time those who received walnut smoothies during the first trial drank the nut-free beverage and vice versa. Neither the volunteers nor the researchers knew which smoothie the participants consumed during each phase of the study.

At the end of each five-day trial, the volunteers—on an empty stomach—looked at images of “desirable” high-fat foods such as cake and onion rings, healthy foods like fruits and vegetables, and non-edible things like rocks or trees. The people who consumed the walnut smoothies consistently showed more activity in the area of the brain associated with regulating the behavior of eating and feeling satisfied (satiety) when they looked at the high-fat foods. By stimulating this area of the brain called the insula, the researchers think that walnuts promote weight loss by reducing cravings. In fact, the study participants reported feeling less hunger and feeling like they could eat less food after their walnut trial as compared to their nut-free trial.

In addition to reducing food cravings, walnuts are low in saturated fats and high in omega-3 fatty acids and are good sources of fiber and protein. The next time you have the urge to snack, grab a handful of walnuts.

 

Karen SweazeaKaren Sweazea, PhD, is an associate professor in the School of Nutrition & Health Promotion and the School of Life Sciences at Arizona State University.

Dog Gazing: Attachment between Hound and Human

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While walking through Santiago, Chile, you are likely to come across at least one of the countless wandering dogs that live on the busy streets. Homeless dogs are a normal part of Santiago’s culture. They are quick to make friends with anyone who offers a welcoming hand or food. They are not quick, however, to forget their friends. If you make a canine companion in this city, as my classmates and I did, it will probably remember you the next time you come down the street.

The feeling of attachment between the dogs and people of Santiago reminded me of the way a mother and her infant gaze into each other’s eyes. This simple, mutual act of love causes an automatic reaction in both the mom and baby, which increases the levels of oxytocin in the body. Oxytocin is a hormone that plays a major role in social bonding between mothers and infants and between romantic partners. The release of oxytocin promotes a feeling of social well-being and may prevent stress. Interacting with the local dogs in Chile made me wonder if this same sense of happiness and bonding occurs between dogs and people.

A research study looking at the bond between humans and dogs found a similar release—and increase—of oxytocin during social interactions, such as gazing, in both the animals and people. The dogs’ hormone levels also increased when people talked to and petted them. Scientists think this looped interaction reaction (bonding in both directions between pooch and person) may be a reason that humans were able to domesticate wild dogs in the first place. Dogs are one of the only animals known to fully recognize human facial features and expressions. This ability likely helps dogs and people communicate, love and take comfort in one another’s presence.

This mutual interaction is likely the cause of a quick, yet memorable, friendship between humans and dogs both at home and in places like the streets of Santiago. So next time you see a dog in passing, don’t be afraid to gaze into its eyes and form a quick friendship.

 

goff black white dogLogan Goff is an exercise physiology major at the University of Dayton. Anne R. Crecelius, PhD, is an assistant professor in the Health and Sport Science Department at the University of Dayton. They spent four weeks in Chile as part of a study abroad program in partnership with the Universidad de los Andes studying nutrition, sports and research in the context of the Chilean culture. This is the final installment in a three-part series (read part one and part two) that spies physiology in this dynamic South American country.  

 

 

 

Fact or Fiction: Does Coca Candy Prevent Altitude Sickness?

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This summer, I spent a month studying at the Universidad de los Andes in Chile. We visited the Atacama Desert, the driest non-polar desert in the world. It is nestled between two sets of mountains; during one of our excursions we hiked up the Andes Mountains to a village called Socaire, located at an altitude of around 11,000 feet above sea level.

Our site coordinator, physiology professor and “temporary mom,” Anne Crecelius, PhD, kindly offered us coca candy, hoping it might prevent the dizziness, nausea and headaches sometimes associated with altitude sickness. She had asked us to drink more water than we usually do, too, just in case anyone in our group responded badly to being so high up. Coca candy is made in part from coca leaves, a plant that local people have chewed on for thousands of years. Coca leaves contain chemical compounds called alkaloids, which have been shown to reduce hunger and calm the side effects of high-altitude travel.

The question remains whether coca really has physiological benefits. The research is mixed. Some studies, citing the uses of coca throughout history, claim that there are significant benefits to chewing coca leaves. They recount improved energy efficiency during exercise, boosted energy levels—similar to the effect of caffeine in coffee—and decreased thirst and appetite.

However, other researchers suggest that the effects of coca leaves are mostly psychological, similar to a placebo effect (using a fake treatment, or placebo, in a group of people to compare the effects with people using a real treatment). In some cases, the group taking the placebo will also see improvement in their condition.

Even if coca leaves do prevent altitude sickness symptoms, the candies we munched on did not contain enough coca to help much. But perhaps they were enough to create some sort of placebo effect in our group, as no one was sick, just a little out of breath. Nevertheless, we enjoyed the town, the candy and a snowball fight near a very old church. Who knew that a small town at high altitude could be so much fun? Most likely, the locals and generations of indigenous people, who also know of the power of coca.

Andrew KramerAndrew Kramer is an exercise physiology major at the University of Dayton. Anne R. Crecelius, PhD, is an assistant professor in the Health and Sport Science Department at the University of Dayton. They spent four weeks in Chile as part of a study abroad program in partnership with the Universidad de los Andes, studying nutrition, sports and research in the context of the Chilean culture. This is the second in a three-part series that spies physiology in this dynamic South American country. Read part one.

 

Beer Does a Body Good?

Drinks: Beer Isolated on White Background

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Bone is a living organ that constantly breaks down and rebuilds itself. As we get older, bone breaks down more and rebuilds less, which often leads to weaker bones over time. If we lose too much bone, we increase our risk of fracture and developing osteoporosis.

Women tend to have weaker bones and a faster rate of bone loss—particularly after menopause—than men. Approximately 50 percent of women in the U.S. over the age of 50 will break a bone due to osteoporosis. If the broken bone is in the hip, there is about a 20 percent chance that the individual will die within one year. Breaking a bone in our later years can significantly affect quality of life and the ability to live independently. Therefore, it is important to do everything we can to minimize age-related bone loss.

Lifestyle choices can help minimize bone loss, including:

  • following a healthy diet with enough calcium and vitamin D;
  • participating in regular physical activity; and
  • refraining from smoking.

Believe it or not, drinking a beer now and then may even help.

Researchers in Spain have discovered a link between beer consumption and bone health in women. They found that women who drank moderate amounts of beer—defined in the U.S. as up to one 12-ounce beer per day—had stronger bones than those who did not.

Beer contains two important nutrients that could be beneficial to bone health: phytoestrogens and silicon. Phytoestrogens are naturally occurring nutrients in plants that act similar to the hormone estrogen. Estrogen protects women from bone loss, but levels drop significantly after menopause. Estrogen deficiency is the primary cause of bone loss after menopause. Silicon is a naturally occurring mineral that may be used as a supplement to reduce bone breakdown and increase bone rebuilding in women with osteoporosis. Beer is one of the most plentiful sources of silicon in the Western diet.

It’s likely that the combination of phytoestrogen and silicon in beer helps limit bone loss. This finding has potentially important implications for bone health, although more study is needed.

It is also important to remember that drinking too much alcohol has many negative health effects, including reduced bone strength. Keep beer intake at a moderate level. That said Aug. 4 is International Beer Day. Drink a toast to healthy bones!

 

Kim HenigeKim Henige, EdD, CSCS, ACSM EP-C, is an associate professor and undergraduate program coordinator in the department of kinesiology at California State University, Northridge.

 

Spinal Cord Injury: Let’s Clear the Air(ways)

Human Spine Anatomy

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The spinal cord is the information processing highway in animals (including humans) that have a backbone. In humans, the spinal cord contains nerve cells called motor neurons that control movement in the muscle fibers of the body, similar to the way a puppeteer controls the movements of a puppet.

About 17,000 people in the U.S. sustain new spinal cord injuries (SCI) each year, and roughly 300,000 people in the U.S. live with an SCI. Motor neuron damage in the spinal cord may lead to a variety of problems, including:

  • decreased mobility and independence;
  • loss of independent breathing;
  • injuries associated with using a wheelchair, such as pinched nerves and muscle strain;
  • partial or total inability to control the bowels and/or bladder; and
  • sexual dysfunction.

New research is addressing all of these important problems, but one area that is not as widely studied is airway clearance. Most of the time we can clear our airways ourselves through coughing and sneezing, but these actions become more difficult with SCI. Close to half of all people with SCI have damaged the motor neurons that control their diaphragm, the muscle that sits below the lungs and helps us breathe. As a result, people with SCI have an increased risk of potentially fatal airway infections such as pneumonia.

Fortunately, about 90 percent of these injuries are incomplete, meaning that some of the neurons still function. People with incomplete SCI have some sensation below the injury site and can often breathe on their own. We only need 10 to 20 percent of our diaphragm muscle to activate in order to breathe, but almost the entire muscle needs to be functional to cough and sneeze. When the motor neurons controlling the diaphragm are injured, the organ isn’t able to generate the forces necessary to clear the airways fully.

Over time, the neurons in the diaphragm that still function in an incomplete SCI may adapt to take over other jobs besides just breathing. This is called neuroplasticity. Neuroplasticity in the spinal cord is a valuable topic of research.  Researchers are looking for new ways to manipulate this process to help people with SCI learn new airway clearing methods which would likely reduce their health risks and improve their quality of life.

 

obaid-khurram-15978141Obaid Khurram is a PhD candidate in the biomedical engineering and physiology program at Mayo Clinic Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. His research focuses on the neuromotor control of the diaphragm muscle, particularly after motor neuron loss or muscle weakness.

 

Can Exercising in Low-Oxygen Conditions Help Breast Cancer Survivors?

Supporting each other in the race against breast cancer

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Physical activity has been linked to a lower risk of developing several types of cancer, including breast cancer. Walking a few hours a week may even decrease the risk of a breast cancer recurrence as well as dying from the disease. The American Cancer Society currently recommends that people recovering from cancer should exercise at least 150 minutes per week.

But people with breast cancer often face a number of challenges to establishing a regular exercise program. Chemotherapy and radiation can affect heart and lung function, and about 60 percent of breast cancer survivors have reduced strength in their legs as a result of a loss of muscle mass. In addition, more than 80 percent of women gain weight after a diagnosis of breast cancer. These factors, along with fatigue from treatment, can prevent breast cancer survivors from being as active as they want to be.

Knowing that exercise is beneficial for people with breast cancer but that they face challenges, researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) are looking at new ways to improve breast cancer survivors’ response to exercise. Their study compares the effects of exercising under low-oxygen conditions—similar to that seen at an altitude of 7,000 feet—with exercising in normal oxygen conditions at sea level.

Elite athletes sometimes train in mountainous areas—between 5,000 and 8,000 feet above sea level—to improve their performance. The air at high altitudes is thinner and contains less oxygen. Lower oxygen levels help boost the number of red blood cells that carry oxygen around your body. Exercising at high altitudes also lets you train harder without the added stress on your joints and muscles that occur at sea level.

While it is impractical to take cancer survivors to the mountains, UAB researchers are trying to bring the mountains to the patients During exercise sessions, participants wear a mask that is connected to a machine that controls the amount of oxygen they breathe in. This mimics the low-oxygen levels of a high-altitude workout.

The study is ongoing, so it is too soon to know how beneficial exercising under lower oxygen levels will be. However, the researchers predict that exercising in low-oxygen conditions will trigger a number of physiological changes that will let people with breast cancer be more active and improve their overall health. If the results of the study are correct, it may lead to new approaches to help breast cancer survivors lead a more active life.

 
John Chatham

John Chatham, DPhil, is a professor of pathology and director of the Division of Molecular and Cellular Pathology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

The Brain in Your Gut

Relation of human brain and guts, second brain

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Did you know your gut has a brain of its own? It’s called the enteric nervous system. The brain in your gut is embedded in the wall of the digestive tract. Together with your “big brain,” the enteric nervous system helps control gastrointestinal function, including the mixing and grinding of food in the stomach and absorption of nutrients in the intestines.

An adult’s enteric nervous system is made up of 200 to 600 million nerve cells (neurons). That’s as many neurons as are in a cat’s brain or even your spinal cord! The neurons in the enteric nervous system interact with smooth muscle to move food through the digestive system. The brain in your gut also plays an important role in regulating your immune system. It attacks bacteria and viruses (pathogens) that invade the digestive tract by releasing protective substances called peptides that make it harder for pathogens to do harm.

Although the brain in your gut functions independently from the “big brain”—and is the only organ in your body that can do so—normal digestive function requires communication between the enteric nervous system and the brain. The enteric nervous system provides sensory information to the brain to help you decide what, when and how much you eat. When you’re hungry or see something you’re craving (like a piece of chocolate cake or a juicy burger), your brain tells your gut to start the digestion process by producing gastric secretions in the stomach.

Problems with the enteric nervous system can lead to different digestive diseases such as irritable bowel syndrome and functional constipation. Studies have demonstrated that losing some of the neurons in the gut can be a cause of these conditions. Understanding how and why these neurons die is an important topic of research that could result in finding new treatments for digestive diseases.

To learn more about digestive disease, visit the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases website.

 

Ninotchska DelvalleNinotchska Delvalle is a doctoral candidate in the neuroscience program at Michigan State University. Her research focuses on how specialized cells of the enteric nervous system (enteric glia) contribute to the development of gastrointestinal disease.